ACPA News

Andrews Receives ACPA Lifetime Achievement Award

Dennis Andrews of Andrews Concrete Pumping, Jessup, Maryland, received the coveted ACPA Lifetime Achievement Award at this year’s ACPA Annual Membership Meeting held on January 24, 2012 at the Las Vegas Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada.

The award was first presented in 1988 and is awarded to those individuals or companies who have fostered and advanced the use of concrete pumping, have improved the conditions under which concrete pumping is performed, shared their knowledge and experiences with others in the industry, and promoted and practiced safe concrete pumping.

Continuing Education Requirement to Change for Operator Certification

Beginning January 1, 2012 a new element to the safety training education requirement for ACPA Operator Certification will be added to include completion of the ACPA Operator Safety Presentation Program.

As a requirement for ACPA Operator Certification, operators must fulfill ACPA sanctioned safety training. Fulfillment of this training requirement will be available in one of three ways:

• Attend an ACPA Operator Safety Seminar;

ACPA Joins California Concrete Pumpers Alliance

If you own a concrete pumping business in the state of California, you’re probably held to some of the most intrusive and complicated regulations than all of the other 49 states—especially when it comes to complying with California’s stringent diesel emission regulations.

New DVD Fulfills ACPA Safety Training Requirement

Work continues on the final stages of the new ACPA Operator Safety Presentation DVD, which will become the mandatory education requirement beginning January 1, 2012 for all operators seeking ACPA certification or recertification.

Important Change to the 17-Foot Rule

The U.S. Department of Labor has made a change to the Federal Code of Regulations regarding crane safety.While concrete pumps are specifically excluded from the new regulations, the hazards for cranes and pumps are similar, including booming into power lines.Like cranes, the number one cause of fatal accidents with pumps is electrocution.

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